How To Use Your Mitre Saw at Home

Hopefully you understand what a mitre saw can actually do for you. However, if you are a little uncertain, or someone who likes the detail, then check out this page on what mitre cuts and bevel cuts actually are.

Likewise if you would like to fully understand the best practises for working safely, then check out our safety page.

By owning your own saw, you now have the capability of being able to do a huge number of tasks. In woodworking, a mitre joint is classed as one of the basic joints, and is used in many work flows such as framing, or types of internal facing and external facing work.

Rather than always having to use basic butt end joints, you can now make neat mitre joints.

Likewise, if you have bought a compound mitre, then you also open up a whole new range of cutting known as bevels. Let’s have a look at the basics of using one of these machines.

Operating a Mitre Saw

If you are someone who will be doing either Home Improvement of Home Repair tasks, then this saw is ideal for just that purpose. For those of us who are into working a lot with wood then this makes a great addition to a table saw or a band saw and helps complete out workshop.

It is really useful for cutting wood, conduit, plastic pipes, plastic guttering and believe me you will find many other uses for this. There are some great useful DIY Project Guides available at Amazon, so as you can see the many different types of projects that you can take on.

You will notice that the chap in the video recommends getting a standard or basic 10″ mitre saw. I would fully support him on this. Unless you plan on doing complex projects on a regular basis, the standard one is more than enough. It is also better priced and as you heard, the blades are cheaper as well. You can read more here about using your saw.

Skirting Boards

Fixing skirting boards to a wallThis is probably one of the most popular home improvement tasks. This is especially true if you are replacing old skirtings, or want to have a different style of skirting, or even a different size. My one tip here would be that if you are going to be doing a lot of skirting, then you should also get a mitre stand.

These boards can be quite long and they need to be supported. If you have someone to hold them for you that is great, but if not you would really need to have a stand. If you would like to find out more on how to do skirting with your saw, then click here.

Coving & Mouldings

image of coving and a corniceAlong with skirting boards, then doing coving on ceilings is one task where a mitre saw really comes into its own. If you have ever tried to fit these, then you know how tricky that can be.

However, with a few tips and tricks, I can help show how to make that task a great deal easier. Again, having a coving or cornice jig makes this even easier, but not absolutely necessary. Click here if you want to know more about coving and mouldings.

Working Safely

image of a warning safety signPower tools are not something that you ever want to mess around with. Power saws in particular, can within seconds, cause serious damage and they need to be treated with care. A sharp blade spinning at 4000 rpm will take care of most things placed under it.

I have put together a pretty extensive guide, along with a couple of quality videos on what to do that will ensure no injuries can happen to you, and you can read my safety guide here.

Using a mitre saw will help you make a whole range of joints. Always remember though that these power saws do have fast spinning blades, and you do need to exercise a lot of care. If you have the saw secured to either a bench or on a mitre saw stand, then that is a great start.

When doing the actual cuts, just make sure you have good lighting, and that your work space is clear. Measure twice and cut once and that will help avoid mistakes.